Let's Play!

This site is about games - not just any games - just the games you play for fun. In the process of growing up, most people lose touch with the sources of their personal power. Fun is one of those sources - especially when it is deep: whole-hearted, whole-minded, whole-bodied.

Because, when the fun gets deep enough, it can heal the world.

What's Fun

street pong

Turning the City into a Playing Board

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One of my favorite amongst my hope-inducing blogs, Pop-Up City, recently featured an article citing Five Interactive Games that Turn the City into a Playing Board.  Today, I’ll be sharing only a couple of these games, thinking that it will be enough to: a) motivate you to explore the plethora of urban promise shared on the Pop-Up City blog, and…

children in sillouhette

Intergenerational Play

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I herewith invite you to join an imaginary social movement. I call it “The Intergenerational Play Project.” Behold, the call to action: The Call to Action The separation between parents and children, adolescents and family is so wide that we hardly recognize ourselves in each other. Our generations have become institutionally isolated, divided out into…

Squirrel-Tree

The Fun Assumption

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Suppose you supposed that the only reason birds sing was the sheer fun of singing, of having songs and the ability to give them voice. Or the fun of discovering themselves suddenly landing on a moving branch in a swaying tree in perfect balance. Or the fun of knowing that whenever the wind or whim…

Luke-I-am-plugged-in

The Playful Art of Mr.Kris

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Kristián Mensa’s art is the embodiment of playfulness. His visual puns make you see the world differently – which I think is probably the highest accomplishment of any artist, even those unfortunate few who keep their art and their playfulness in two separate galleries. Kristián publishes much of his work on his blog and Instagram.…

A blessing from Spock

Deeper Fun

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Somewhere near the bottom of the Games for Playful Players collection, there’s a small collection of playlists, so to speak, of games (get it? play list? games?) collected from the main collection according to some theme or whim. There’s one called Games for the Spirit. This particular collection collects games, most of which I’ve invented…

Kids at play

Theories of Play

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For some sweetly serendipitous reason, my brother-in-improv Gary Schwartz published a quote from Neva Boyd’s A Theory of Play in my Playful Path community. It just so happens that Ms. Boyd is also the author of the Handbook of Recreational Games, a book of real, actual, play-for-the-fun-of-it-all games that booted me joyfully along my gameful path about four years after I had…

We are particularly interested in one kind of fun – the playful kind, the kind of playful that makes us laugh together. Because in laughing together we are sharing the wonder of the fun we create, the love we manifest, the mind-body-soul-deep wellness we share, the momentary lowering of the divisions that separate us.

“To play is to be the bridge between mastery and mystery, chaos and control, the foolishly brave and the bravely foolish.”

– the Oaqui

Bernard De Koven

Bernard De Koven, author of The Well-Played Game and A Playful Path, describes and illustrates the power of adult playfulness, engaging the audience in several of his more playful games, and demonstrating how joyfully adults welcome the opportunity to expose their playful selves. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.

Fun Is Easy

It’s wherever you are, in whatever you are doing or sensing or thinking. It’s between you and the person you’re with or the machine you’re using or the table you’re sitting at or the path you’re walking down. It’s not something to strive for. But something to melt into, to sink into, to open up to. Listen. You can almost hear the laughter. Breathe. You can almost taste the joy. Listen a little more closely. Breathe a little more deeply. And there it is again. Fun. Real fun. Deep, forever fun.

Fun isn’t the hard thing. The hard thing is remembering to have it ...